CAMERA BOOST, VIRTUAL REALITY IN NEW SAMSUNG, LG GADGETS

To revive interest in smartphones, Samsung and
LG are improving their cameras and embracing
the nascent world of virtual reality.
And Samsung is being backed by Facebook’s
Mark Zuckerberg, who said Sunday the
companies are teaming up to push VR in mobile
phones and social networking.
“Together this is by far the best mobile VR
experience you can offer,” Zuckerberg said
at Samsung’s unveiling of their new flagship
phones in Barcelona.

Samsung’s new Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge promise
better photos under low-light conditions, in part
with sensors that capture more light. The main
camera on LG’s upcoming G5 smartphone will
have two lenses - one for standard shots and
another with a wider angle so you can capture
more of what’s in front of you without having to
step back.
Both companies will also release several camerarelated
accessories. Samsung, which unveiled a
virtual-reality device for consumers last fall, will
now make a 360-degree camera for everyday
folks to capture and share VR images. The
company will also make smartphone cases with
a hole to screw in special lenses, such as wide
angle and fisheye views.
LG will have its own VR headset - a lighter
version of Samsung’s Gear VR - as well as a
smartphone attachment that functions as a
camera grip with physical buttons to take shots
and control video recording. The attachment is
part of LG’s new modular approach to design;
you’ll be able to pop out the phone’s bottom
and swap in new hardware features.
The announcements at the Mobile World
Congress wireless show in Barcelona, Spain,
come as worldwide smartphone growth has
slowed, particularly for high-end devices such as
Samsung’s S and LG’s G series. Many consumers
have turned to lower-cost Android devices that
sport features considered top of the line just a
few years ago.
“Today we stand at that beginning of new
era,” said Samsung president of mobile
communications business, DJ Koh. “Here
at the beginning of 2016 who doesn’t take
smartphones for granted? Having seen
everything the smartphone can deliver, at
Samsung we have other ideas.”
To underscore Samsung’s emphasis on VR,
Zuckerberg made an appearance at the
Samsung event to announce a partnership
between the two companies to push their
VR products.
“(VR) is now mainly used for gaming, but that is
quickly changing,” Zuckerberg said. “That is why
Facebook is investing so much in VR, so we can
deliver these social experiences. And that is why
we are working with Samsung.”
Analysts said VR was critical for the industry to
get customers to part with old phones that they
are still happy with and buy new ones.

“All the smartphone makers are now competing
with themselves from two-to-three years
ago, their problem is that phones from twoto-
three years ago are still in use,” Ian Fogg,
head of mobile analysis at IHS Technology,
told The Associated Press. “VR is essential. It
is a smartphone industry initiative to drive
consumers to upgrade.”
Phone makers used to guarantee upgrades by
making phones bigger and bigger - but phones
can’t get much bigger for one-handed use. In
fact, the new LG phone is shrinking to 5.3 inches,
from 5.5 inches last year. Samsung’s Edge is
getting bigger, at 5.5 inches, but because the
sides curve, the phone won’t be much wider. The
main S7 model is staying constant at 5.1 inches.
With size out of the equation, phone makers
have to innovate elsewhere.
That’s been crucial for Samsung, in particular, as
its chief rival, Apple, largely matched Samsung on
size, while boosting the iPhone camera’s resolution
to 12 megapixels from 8. The iPhone has also
gotten better at low-light shots, even surpassing
some stand-alone, point-and-shoot cameras.
Realizing that the megapixel count alone doesn’t
necessarily translate to quality images, Samsung
is reducing resolution in the new phones to
12 megapixels from 18. That allows individual
pixels on the sensors to be larger, thus capturing
more light. The new cameras also allow the
camera’s aperture to open wider, letting in more
light. Together, the shutter needs to stay open
for a shorter time, reducing the blurring that
sometimes mars indoor and night shots.
Samsung also says its new phones will have
a faster focus, which it says will improve
performance at low light.
And for the selfie camera, Samsung is turning
the screen into a flash, similar to what Apple
introduced last fall.
Samsung is restoring the ability to add storage,
but the battery won’t be replaceable by users.
Instead, Samsung is increasing the battery
capacity in both models, though the Edge’s
larger screen and other new features in both
models, including an always-on mode, will sip
away power.
The new phones will start shipping March 11,
with advance orders to begin this week. In
some markets, including the U.S., Samsung is
including a Gear VR headset for free to those
who order ahead of time.
Prices will vary by carrier and region. In the
U.S., AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile are offering the
regular version for $650 to $695 and the Edge
version for about $100 more. Verizon hasn’t
announced prices yet.
In a few months, Samsung will start selling its
Gear 360 camera, a device with front and back
lenses to stitch together 360-degree videos
for VR devices and apps. Samsung phones will
come with apps for viewing those videos on the
Gear VR and sharing them with friends.
VR is still in its early days, with much of the
interest coming from hard-core gamers and tech
pioneers. Samsung wants to make it easier for
everyday people to create VR videos - so that
their friends will buy VR headsets to view them.
LG, meanwhile, designed the LG 360 VR
headset to work with an LG smartphone that’s
attached by a cable. With Samsung’s VR device,
the smartphone is inserted at eye level and
becomes the headset’s display, increasing the
weight on the head. LG’s version has built-in,
lighter displays in the headset’s eyepieces. LG
is also making a 360-degree camera similar
to Samsung’s.
Prices and release dates for the LG phone and
accessories from both companies have yet to be
announced, though the LG phone is expected in
the U.S. in April.
Neither VR system will be as powerful as fullfledged
VR devices coming this year. HTC said
Sunday that a consumer version of the Vive
will start selling in early April for $799, with
ordering to begin Feb. 29. A personal computer
is required and sold separately.
VR isn’t limited to high-end devices: On Saturday,
Alcatel announced a mid-range Idol 4S - with
packaging that can be folded into VR headset.

SAMSUNG GALAXY S6 EDGE+ REVIEW
45 BEST ANDROID GAMES
BEST NEW PHONES AND TABLETS FOR 2015
HOW TO SECURE YOUR NEW PHONE OR TABLET FOR FREE
5 GREAT TECH THAT WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE
6 LEADERS WHO SHAPE THE WORLD
5 THINGS ABOUT RESIDENT EVIL REVELATIONS 2
10 FUNNIEST GAMES ON PS3
8 INDIE ROUNDUP GAMES
TOP TEN GUILTY PLEASURE GAMES
APPLE WATCH VS HUAWEI WATCH
10 REASON HOW GOOGLE CHANGE THE WORLD
10 BEST FREE GAMES FOR YOUR PHONE OR TABLET
21 iOS 9 TIPS

KNOWLEDGE HISTORY HOW TO ANIMAL LIFE CRIME CELEB GAMES MYSTERY FOOD SPACE TRAVEL FINANCE HEALTH BEAUTY TECH VEHICLE ENTERTAINMENT GARDEN PRODUCT JOKES


Fantastical Fish, circa 1719

BY ABBY OLENA

In 1685, when Louis Renard was seven or eight years old, he
and his family left their native France to settle in the Netherlands,
where Huguenots—French Protestants—could
worship without fear of persecution. In Amsterdam, Renard
led a colorful life as a spy, a seller of patent medicines, and a
book publisher until his death in 1746. His only known likeness
shows him smoking a pipe in a brothel as scantily clad
women parade by.

SOMETHING’S FISHY: Though many aspects of the drawings in Fishes,
Crayfishes and Crabs do not represent reality, more than half of the
engravings can be identified to species.

WARNOCK LIBRARY AND OCTAVO CORP

As the Age of Enlightenment dawned across Europe,
Renard published Fishes, Crayfishes and Crabs, of Diverse
Colors and Extraordinary Form, That Are Found around
the Islands of the Moluccas and on the Coasts of the Southern
Lands, his only scientific book. He called it “one of the
most precious works to enrich natural history since the birth
of literature,” according to a 1984 article published in Natural
History magazine by University of Washington professor
Theodore Pietsch. Renard’s two-volume tome comprises 100
color plates with 460 individual engravings of fish, crustaceans,
stick insects, a dugong, and a mermaid, and includes
annotations in French, Dutch, and Malay.
The book also asserts that the engravings are authentic,
but Pietsch, whose careful annotation and translation gives
vast detail about Renard’s life and work, initially disagreed.
“Despite these repeated promises that nothing is embellished
beyond the truth, the colors used in the paintings are,
more often than not, applied in a totally arbitrary fashion and
have no similarity whatsoever to those of the living animal,”
Pietsch wrote in Natural History. “Even more unfortunate is
the gross inaccuracy of many of the renderings themselves,
some being impossible to identify with actual species.” Readers
in the eighteenth century had reacted similarly. “Of course,
my first impression, like everyone else, was that these are just
totally mythological, fantastic things,” Pietsch recently told
The Scientist.
No existing historical records show that Renard ever went
to the Moluccas—now known as the Maluku Islands, which
are part of modern-day Indonesia—so someone else had to
have created the images. Though multiple artists probably
participated, one known contributor was Samuel Fallours,
who worked for the Dutch East India Company, first as a soldier,
then as an assistant to religious leaders on the islands.
“In what’s now Indonesia . . . artists were making these drawings
because they were getting paid,” says Pietsch, which supported
his suspicion that the engravings were inauthentic.
But as Pietsch examined the engravings more closely, he
realized that more than half of them could be identified to
species, and still more to genus or family, leaving fewer than
10 percent of the engravings based on no known animal.

“Thus, to cast the work off as being without scientific merit
is to greatly underestimate its value,” Pietsch wrote in the
commentary accompanying his 1995 English translation of
Fishes, Crayfishes and Crabs. With this collection of images
and descriptions, Renard “has given us an intriguing glimpse
of what science was like in the late seventeenth and early
eighteenth centuries.”

7 THINGS EVERY WOMAN SHOULD KNOW ABOUT FEMALE VIAGRA
EARLY TRAUMA'S LASTING DAMAGE
LOW-CARB VS. LOW-FAT
LONELY PEOPLE WIRED DIFFERENTLY
OLD MINES LEAKING TOXIC SLUDGE
CONTROVERSIAL FEMALE VIAGRA APPROVES
HOW TO RESPOND TO TERROR ON A TRAIN?
WILL AD BLOCKERS KILL ONLINE MEDIA?
YOUR BODY ON A DETOX
DISASTERS ACROSS HISTORY
FIVE TACTICS TRAINERS SWEAR BY
A-Z URBAN LEGENDS
13 CLEVER WAYS TO CLEAN
17 SECRETS OF HAPPY FAMILIES
19 WAYS TO COOK EVERYTHING FASTER
18 THINGS WE'VE LEARNED SO FAR
13 THINGS THE BEAUTY INDUSTRY WON'T TELL YOU
MIX YOUR OWN CLEANERS
YOUR FOOD FEARS GET A REALITY CHECK
30 MOST SHOCKING MOMENTS IN GAME OF THRONES
7 SECRETS OF SEAFOOD
CHAMPION OF BREAKFAST CEREALS
BOUNTY OF BANANAS
UNDERSTANDING YOUR BABY'S SKIN
50 SECRETS YOUR GROCER WON'T TELL YOU


KNOWLEDGE HISTORY HOW TO ANIMAL LIFE CRIME CELEB GAMES MYSTERY FOOD SPACE TRAVEL FINANCE HEALTH BEAUTY TECH VEHICLE ENTERTAINMENT GARDEN PRODUCT JOKES

Elder Pharmacology

Studying and treating the chronic diseases
associated with aging needs serious revamping.
BY NIR BARZILAI

What is the greatest menace associated with age-related
diseases? Hypertension? Obesity? High cholesterol?
No. It’s simply the number of years an individual lives.
For example, elevated plasma cholesterol is considered a major
risk factor for cardiovascular-disease death. Yet, when compared
with aging itself, the risk of high cholesterol alone pales. For a typical
adult, high cholesterol poses a threefold increase in the risk of
dying from cardiovascular disease. Simply aging from 35 to 85,
however, increases that risk about a thousand fold.
Similar patterns are observed for cancer, type 2 diabetes,
and Alzheimer’s disease. National Institutes of Health data
indicate that the risk of dying from these diseases accelerates
logarithmically by approximately 100 to 1,000-fold between
ages 35 and 85. No wonder so many elderly people deal with
several age-related diseases simultaneously, and can face
additional complications from taking multiple drugs, prescribed
separately to treat each disease.
This reality is further aggravated by the fact that many carefully
conducted clinical trials exclude patients over the age of 65
as well as patients taking multiple drugs. This means that while
the majority of drugs are consumed by the elderly, there is little
to no “evidence-based medicine” to inform us about the safety
of polypharmacological therapy for this population.
And an even more fundamental problem looms.
Gerontologists have made significant progress in understanding
the biology of aging. They’ve identified pathways
involved in normal aging, flagged genes associated with
increased longevity, and even extended healthy life span by
genetic means, nutritional manipulation, or through drugs in
a variety of animal models, including mammals.
One conclusion from these studies is that the biology of a
young body is substantially different from that of an old body.
Not every treatment that works in the young will work or be
safe in the elderly.
Estrogen therapy for postmenopausal women exemplifies
this. The Women’s Health Initiative terminated its landmark
study on estrogen replacement because study participants were
showing higher-than-expected levels of breast cancer, cardiovascular
disease, and cognitive decline. In retrospect, many mechanistic
studies on rodents have used young, ovariectomized female
mice as models to induce cardiovascular disease, stroke, or other
diseases relevant to human females. In that research, estrogen
seemed protective. However, when those studies were repeated
in older, postmenopausal female mouse models, estrogen therapy
was detrimental. The fact that a single drug like estrogen did not
show anti-aging properties or protections opens the possibility
that this holds true for many other approved drugs used to treat
chronic conditions associated with aging.
The increased use of statins to treat cardiovascular disease—
one of the biggest contributions to mortality in the
Western world (~40 percent)—is another example. There is
no doubt that statins have decreased the occurrence of cardiovascular
events and mortality. And recent recommendations
have emerged that may lead to even more people being
treated with this drug class.
However, statins consistently did not change overall mortality!
How does this math work? If statins reduce a major
cause of mortality, but do not change overall mortality, it suggests
people on statins die from other causes. Indeed, we and
other researchers have shown that statin use significantly
increases diabetes risk, supporting the notion that these
drugs may actually contribute to other diseases of aging (Diabetes
Care, 32:1924-29, 2009).
In the statin case, it is important to note who is pushing the
agenda. Because of great progress in preventing and treating
cardiovascular disease, cardiologists have deepened the belief
that heart health is central. Cardiologists also inform us that
decreased blood pressure is good for the heart. But studies have
shown that blood pressure status and cognitive function in the
elderly are related. Low blood pressure in elderly people is associated
with reduced cognitive performance, while mild hypertension
may help prevent cognitive decline (Am J Hypertens,
16:818-26, 2003). Other studies have suggested that treating
high blood pressure with some drugs may accelerate cognitive
decline (Amer J Ther, 17:358-64, 2010).
So, if there are real risks associated not just with multiple
drugs but with any single drug, what solutions must we consider?
First, in order to ensure safety and effectiveness, a significant
percentage of elderly subjects (at least 50 percent of the study sample)
needs to be included in clinical drug trials for any age-related
disease. Another approach is to design a sub-trial on the elderly.
Second, when a drug is promoted by a medical professional
group, its effect on overall mortality needs to be assessed. It
has to be clear that this drug is not merely exchanging one disease
for another.
Third, studies of exceptionally long-lived people, such as the
LonGenity and Longevity Genes Project at Albert Einstein College
of Medicine, which includes healthy centenarians and their
families, have identified functional genetic changes associated with
such longevity. The goal of such research is to translate these findings
into drugs that can extend healthy life span for people who do
not share this genetic pattern, and some drugs based such projects
are currently in clinical trials.
Lastly, and most important, developing drugs that are based
on an understanding of the biology of aging has the potential to
provide therapies for the prevention of many age-related diseases.
Such a strategy may promote healthy life spans and significantly
reduce the financial burden of late-life illness and
end-of-life care.
Nir Barzilai is a professor of medicine and genetics at Albert
Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in New York
City and director of Einstein’s Institute for Aging Research and
its two Centers of Excellence (NIH-Nathan Shock Center and
Paul F. Glenn Center for the Biology of Human Aging Research).
He is also the co-scientific director of the American Federation
for Aging Research. His research focuses on mechanisms of
aging, including the genetic determinants of life span and the
role of nutrients in extending life.

GREEN MUCUS MEANS YOU NEED ANTIBIOTICS
HOW TO CURING A COUGH
TOP 10 APPS TO TRACK YOUR HEALTH
SEX CAN MAKE YOU SMARTER
SPOTTING THE SIGNS OF EARLY-ONSET ALZHEIMER'S
SPICE UP YOUR FITNESS ROUTINE!
FARM FRESH PHARMACY!
THE CALORIE KILLING CONDIMENT!
TURNING THE CORNER ON CHILDHOOD OBESITY
VITAMINS COULD BACKFIRE
A REVEALING ANCIENT CRYSTAL
HAND DRIERS SPREAD BACTERIA
MARITAL STRESS LINKED TO HEART DISEASE
EBOLA SOURCE REVEALED
OSTEOARTHRITIS SOS

WHY IS SCUBA DIVING SO DANGEROUS?

HOW FAR CAN SPIDER'S EYES SEE IT?

WHAT’S THE NEWEST ANIMAL?

ARE ANTIBIOTICS BAD FOR YOUR HEALTH?

HOW DOES YOUR EYE COLOUR AFFECT WHAT YOU SEE?

ARE HYDROGEN TRAINS A POSSIBILITY?

MIGHT THE BODY OF LAIKA THE DOG STILL FLOATING IN SPACE?

WHY IS WHOLEMEAL BREAD BETTER FOR YOU THAN WHITE?

HOW IS BULLET PROOF GLASS MADE?

HOW DOES SALT PRESERVE FOOD?

EIFFEL’S $650 BILLION TOWER


KNOWLEDGE HISTORY HOW TO ANIMAL LIFE CRIME CELEB GAMES MYSTERY FOOD SPACE TRAVEL FINANCE HEALTH BEAUTY TECH VEHICLE ENTERTAINMENT GARDEN PRODUCT JOKES